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377,000 Yemenis Dead As Biden Goes Back On Promise To End The War

According to the United Nations, around 377,000 Yemenis have died, since 2015, as a result of the ongoing war which has ripped through the country’s population. Such staggering statistics are partly why constant calls are made for the US President to help end the war. despite promising to do so, Joe Biden has only made things worse.

Currently, the United Nations puts the estimated Yemen war death toll at 377,000, but has warned that if the conflict is not ended soon that figure could jump up to 1.3 million dead by 2030. A study by ‘Save the Children’, which looked at civilian casualties between 2018-2020, said that at least 25% of those killed were children. This puts the death toll between those years at over 2,300 children. The UN added in that they weren’t able to track all deaths, indicating the toll was much higher. This statistic just looks at direct warfare and doesn’t include those who died from disease, dehydration or lack of food. According to UNICEF, 21 million Yemenis are in need of International Aid, 11 million of which are children.

At this point, even if the war is solved prior to 2030, the humanitarian catastrophe currently unfolding will still be a hurdle to solve. This is why the United States government must be held accountable for its insidious lies about ending the war (and its undeniable part in beginning it) whilst doing nothing to stop its Saudi ally from escalating tensions even further.

The Special Envoy of the UN’s Secretary-General for Yemen, Hans Grundberg, said, in late December of 2021, that the recent escalation in warfare between Saudi Arabia and Yemen’s Ansarallah is the worst in years. He additionally cited the civilian casualties that have come as a result of the Saudi bombing campaign of Yemen’s Capital City Sanaa and of the battle for oil rich Marib.

One very important point to note here is that this war cannot be viewed purely as a “humanitarian crisis”, although this is a fact on the ground, the crisis has been caused by a politically driven conflict. Instead of treating Yemen like a disaster zone after some freak weather event, as mainstream media often attempts to do, we must see it for what it is: a foreign intervention. Saudi Arabia is propping up an unwanted and unsupported President, Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, which the international community calls “the internationally recognized President”. Yet it is important to note that this so-called “international community” only consists of those willing to fall in line with the agenda of the leading powers, and does not necessarily represent the entire opinion of the world’s respective leaders. Internationally Hadi may be accepted, but domestically he is not — and if you believe in democracy then he has no legitimate right to power. 

Hadi’s forces have been consistently accused of fighting side by side with Daesh and Al-Qaeda, all while they have the full weight of the Saudi/US coalition of foreign interventionists behind them and do not represent the interests of Yemeni people. US President Joe Biden, after the democrats had used the Yemen war to attack former President Trump, understood that the war had become unpopular and played on this when taking office.

Biden, who was Vice President when the war was started under the Obama-administration, vowed in early February to end all support for Saudi “offensive actions” and “relevant arms sales”. Yet Biden approved a weapons deal worth over 600 million dollars to the Saudis and is yet to utter a word about Saudi Arabia’s bombardment of countless civilian targets in Yemen’s Sanaa this December.

It also has to be made clear that the United States is directly involved in the war on Yemen. It supplies the Saudis and Emiratis with the weapons, provides logistics, and even uses its own military to strike targets in Yemen. The United States was even revealed to have collaborated with UAE-backed proxy forces in the South of Yemen, in the sustainment and operation of torture chambers.

The blood is currently on Joe Biden’s hands. To add insult to injury he even spoke to the severity of the situation in Yemen, showing that he recognizes the severity of the ongoing war and the reasons why it must be ended. Until the US government decides to “turn them into the pariah they are”, to use Biden’s words from 2020, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia will not cease to bombard, blockade and loot Yemen into the ground. It is clear that Mohammed Bin Salman has no intention of ending the war by himself, which leaves two options: Ansarallah will eventually take more and more territory as the Saudi-led coalition collectively punishes average Yemenis, or the US steps in to force the conflict to an end. Either way, it will no doubt fall to the people of the world to ensure these governments have answered for the untold suffering and destruction they have collectively wrought in the lives of the Yemeni people. 

Robert Inlakesh
Robert Inlakesh is a documentary filmmaker, journalist, writer, Middle-East analyst & news correspondent for The Last American Vagabond.
https://twitter.com/falasteen47

One Reply to “377,000 Yemenis Dead As Biden Goes Back On Promise To End The War

  1. We do not deserve to be on this beautiful planet if we are allowing all of this
    tradgedy to go on eons and eons, it is absolutely insane that we call ourselves
    advanced humans when we let monsters attack innocent children and
    humans what kind of people do this???? Its time to stop now

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