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New York Assemblyman Unveils Bill To Suppress Non-Government-Approved Free Speech

In a bill aimed at securing a “right to be forgotten,” introduced by Assemblyman David I. Weprin and (as Senate Bill 4561 by state Sen. Tony Avella), liberal New York politicians would http://www.conn29th.org/university/example-of-definition-of-terms-in-a-research-paper.htm resume unfinished download https://www.nationalautismcenter.org/letter/essay-advertising-techniques/26/ effects women using viagra book titles in essays mla buy cialis online canadian pharmacy go see url order viagra from mexico https://artsgarage.org/blog/american-beauty-thesis-statement/83/ sample of exemplification essay go here viagra supplier us online pharmacy thesis in a speech viagra calgary custom speech writer website help writing top admission essay on usa https://medpsychmd.com/nurse/canadian-cialis-sale/63/ cover letter biology https://www.platinumed.com/mentrial/viagra-monograph/29/ help me on my homework help writing illustration essay watch female viagra blog https://heystamford.com/writing/buy-research-papers-nj/8/ write paper service see url buy thesis papers see dissertation introduction proofreading websites usa achat viagra site us en ligne canada follow url require people to remove ‘inaccurate,’ ‘irrelevant,’ ‘inadequate’ or ‘excessive’ statements about others

  • Within 30 days of a ”request from an individual,”
  • “all search engines and online speakers] shall remove … content about such individual, and links or indexes to any of the same, that is ‘inaccurate’, ‘irrelevant’, ‘inadequate’ or ‘excessive,’ ”
  • “and without replacing such removed … content with any disclaimer [or] takedown notice.”
  • “ ‘[I]naccurate’, ‘irrelevant’, ‘inadequate’, or ‘excessive’ shall mean content,”
  • “which after a significant lapse in time from its first publication,”
  • “is no longer material to current public debate or discourse,”
  • “especially when considered in light of the financial, reputational and/or demonstrable other harm that the information … is causing to the requester’s professional, financial, reputational or other interest,”
  • “with the exception of content related to convicted felonies, legal matters relating to violence, or a matter that is of significant current public interest, and as to which the requester’s role with regard to the matter is central and substantial.”

Failure to comply would make the search engines or speakers liable for, at least, statutory damages of $250/day plus attorney fees.

As The Washington Post’s Eugene Volokh rages, under this bill, newspapers, scholarly works, copies of books on Google Books and Amazon, online encyclopedias (Wikipedia and others) — all would have to be censored whenever a judge and jury found (or the author expected them to find) that the speech was “no longer material to current public debate or discourse” (except when it was “related to convicted felonies” or “legal matters relating to violence” in which the subject played a “central and substantial” role).



And of course the bill contains no exception even for material of genuine historical interest; after all, such speech would have to be removed if it was “no longer material to current public debate.” Nor is there an exception for autobiographic material, whether in a book, on a blog or anywhere else. Nor is there an exception for political figures, prominent businesspeople and others.

But the deeper problem with the bill is simply that it aims to censor what people say, under a broad, vague test based on what the government thinks the public should or shouldn’t be discussing. It is clearly unconstitutional under current First Amendment law, and I hope First Amendment law will stay that way (no matter what rules other countries might have adopted).

Remember: There is no “right to be forgotten” in the abstract; no law can ensure that, and no law can be limited to that. Instead, the “right” this aims to protect is the power to suppress speech — the power to force people (on pain of financial ruin) to stop talking about other people, when some government body decides that they should stop.

Source: www.zerohedge.com

Question Everything, Come To Your Own Conclusions.

One Reply to “New York Assemblyman Unveils Bill To Suppress Non-Government-Approved Free Speech

  1. As for me, none of my family members sacrificed, served nor died in vain. Although I censor my own speech out of consideration to others, pick and choose my battles wisely and don’t run my mouth about things I’m not efficiently knowledgeably of, I will continue to exercise freedom of speech and appreciate my First Amendment rights until I take my last breath.
    I will also recognize all others freedom to do likewise even though and especially because they may have different views. I don’t want to be suppressed and wish others would be as considerate.
    It’s sad that lies and misinformation abound, but it goes with the territory. We’ve all had to deal with this, sometimes legally. But if the government gets to paint our picture…I’m not hanging it on my wall !

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